Rogers Park

Far North Side

      Prayer Points

  • There is a strong emphasis on church-planting in Rogers Park. Pray for unity among various churches and ministries.


  • As one of the most diverse and populous neighborhoods in Chicago, Rogers Park is home to many nations and peoples of different religious beliefs. Pray for missional relationships to form and for the gospel to take root in this community. Pray specifically that the numerous refugee and immigrant populations will respond favorably to a holistic gospel.


  • Pray for the teachers and administrators in the neighborhood schools who are serving and guiding children, among which nearly seventy different languages are spoken.

      Ethnic Breakdown

  • Asian (6.4%)
  • Black or African American (26.4%)
  • Hispanic or Latino (25.7%)
  • White (38.2%)

But you beloved...praying in the Holy Spirit;  keep yourselves in the love of God. - Jude 20:21

Neighborhood Background

Rogers Park is one of Chicago’s most diverse and populous neighborhoods. In 1878, settlers moved into the area to form the village of Rogers Park, which was eventually annexed to Chicago in 1893.


The population jumped drastically with the opening of Howard Station along the “L” tracks. Rogers Park became primarily home to renters due to the establishment of apartment complexes in the region. New construction in the 1960s consisted primarily of moderately-sized apartment buildings, townhouses, and nursing homes. Additionally, two institutions of higher education were established in Rogers Park during this time: Loyola University Chicago (1906) and Mundelein College (1930).


Over the years, the population of Rogers Park has become increasingly diverse and aged. The 1960s saw the ushering in of Russian and Eastern Europeans, while the 1970s brought African Americans and immigrants from Asia and the Americas to the region. Since then, Rogers Park has also become home to several nursing and retirement homes.

information courtesy of Moody Publishers

"Chicago Neighborhood Prayer Guide" by Dr. John Fuder with Elizabeth Koenig